Female
Check

Member Pricing – $120.00

Non-Member Pricing – $159.00

Female Check

Optimum hormone levels are essential for women to perform at their best. From energy, metabolism, vitality and libido, hormones play a critical role in your overall wellness. These specific hormone tests are designed for females to gain a deeper understanding of these important signaling molecules.

Note: Please allow apx. 10 business days for your results to appear after you have submitted your sample.

Overview | Summary | Detail

Category: SKU: 1008

Description

Click on the tests below to learn more about each one and discuss with your physician if this testing is appropriate for you to better manage your personal health or existing disease.

Female Check

Female Check

Below are the individual tests that are included in Ultimate Health Check that will show on your Prevé report in the MyPreve area. 

Female Check

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    Estradiol

    Estradiol is an estrogen produced primarily in ovaries in female and generated from testosterone in male. Measurement of serum estradiol forms an integral part of the assessment of reproductive function in women and sex drive in men. Estradiol has a large fluctuation during the menstrual cycle in premenopausal women and it is much lower in men and postmenopausal women. Abnormal estradiol level in conjunction with other markers (such as luteinizing hormone and follicle stimulating hormone) are associated with reproductive system dysfunction and failure, and increased risk for bone fractures in women, and in men low levels could indicate a low sex drive.

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    Total Testosterone

    Testosterone is an essential hormone produced both in men and women. Low levels of total testosterone can lead to low sex drive and reduce bone mass. Most circulating testosterone is bound to sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and a small proportion exists as free hormone. Total testosterone, SHBG and free testosterone are used together to indicate to diseases of various organs such as testicles, pituitary gland (a tiny organ, the size of a pea, found at the base of your brain), thyroid, ovaries, and adrenal glands (two small glands located on the top of each kidney).

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    Free Testosterone

    Testosterone is an essential hormone produced both in men and women. Low Free Testosterone can lead to decreased sexual function, loss of pubic hair, and loss of motivation and concentration. Most circulating testosterone is bound to sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and a small proportion exists as free hormone. Total testosterone, SHBG and free testosterone are used together to indicate to diseases of various organs such as testicles, pituitary gland (a tiny organ, the size of a pea, found at the base of your brain), thyroid, ovaries, and adrenal glands (two small glands located on the top of each kidney).

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    DHEAS Female

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is a hormone produced in the adrenal glands in both men and women. Adrenal glands sit above each kidney. DHEA helps produce other hormones, including testosterone and estrogen. Abnormal DHEA level is related to adrenal disease, polycystic ovary syndrome, and pituitary gland disease.

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    Progesterone

    Progesterone is a hormone produced in the ovary during the second half of the menstrual cycle. Progesterone, either alone or in combination with other hormones, is taken by women as an oral contraceptive to prevent pregnancy. However, abnormal progesterone levels in your body are related to adrenal disease, increased risk for developing breast cancer, irregular and heavy menstrual bleeding, as well as ovary disease.

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    Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH)

    Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) is a hormone produced by the pituitary gland, which is a small organ located at the base of your brain. FSH, luteinizing hormone (LH) and progesterone are essential for reproduction and pregnancy in women. FSH and LH stimulate the production of estrogens (female sex hormone) and androgens (male sex hormone) such as estradiol and testosterone. Abnormal FSH and LH are generally observed in reproductive system dysfunction or failure and pituitary and hypothalamus (which sits near the pituitary gland in the center of your brain) diseases.

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    Luteinizing Hormone (LH)

    Luteinizing hormone (LH) is a hormone produced by the pituitary gland, which is a small organ located at the base of your brain. LH, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and progesterone are essential for reproduction and pregnancy in women. FSH and LH stimulate the production of estrogens (female sex hormone) and androgens (male sex hormone) such as estradiol and testosterone. Abnormal FSH and LH are generally observed in reproductive system dysfunction or failure and pituitary and hypothalamus (which sits near the pituitary gland in the center of your brain) diseases.

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    Prolactin

    Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT) is an enzyme found mostly in liver and kidney cells. Our body releases ALT into the blood when the liver is damaged (i.e. hepatitis and cirrhosis). ALT is usually measured concurrently with AST as part of a liver function panel to determine the source of organ damage (liver or heart).

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    Cortisol

    Cortisol is a main glucocorticoid which plays a critical role in your blood sugar metabolism, stress response, bone growth, blood pressure control, immune system function, and even nervous system function. Abnormal cortisol level in blood may indicate diseases of pituitary (a tiny organ sits in the base of your brain) and adrenal glands (two small glands located on the top of each kidney). Dysregulated cortisol level in your body can lead to a number of health problems such as anxiety, depression, headaches, trouble sleeping, weight gain, and heart disease.

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    Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG)

    Sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) is a protein that is produced by the liver and binds tightly to the hormones testosterone and estradiol (an estrogen). The main function of SHBG is to transport the sex hormones within the blood stream and to target tissues, and to regulate the balance of various sex hormones in your body. A defect in SHBG production could lead to insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, increased intra-abdominal fat deposition and an unfavorable cardiovascular risk profile. Abnormal SHBG levels are also associated with polycystic ovarian syndrome, eating disorder, thyroid dysfunction, and metabolic syndrome.