Lipids
Check

Member Pricing – $149.00

Non-Member Pricing – $199.00

Lipids Check

Traditional lipid assessments include the typical tests you would receive during a routine, annual physical – for example: cholesterol, HDL, LDL and triglycerides. We’ve included advanced testing in this panel in order for you to work with your physician on reducing risks you may not have known you have due to insufficient testing, including the inherited risk factor – Lipoprotein (a).

  • Total Cholesterol
  • HDL and LDL
  • Triglycerides
  • Apolipoprotein B
  • Apolipoprotein A1
  • Apo B:Apo A1 ratio
  • Small Dense LDL
  • Lipoprotein(a)

Note: Please allow apx. 10 business days for your results to appear after you have submitted your sample.

Overview | Summary | Detail

Category: SKU: 1003

Description

Click on the tests below to learn more about each one and discuss with your physician if this testing is appropriate for you to better manage your personal health or existing disease.

Lipids Check

Lipids Check

Below are the individual tests that are included in Ultimate Health Check that will show on your Prevé report in the MyPreve area. 

Traditional & Advanced Lipids Check

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    Total Cholesterol

    A measure of the total amount of cholesterol in your blood. When there is too much cholesterol in your blood, it builds up in the walls of your arteries, causing a process called atherosclerosis, a form of heart disease. As the arteries become narrowed and blood flow to the heart muscle is slowed down, a blood clot can suddenly block the blood flow to your heart or brain and cause a heart attack or stroke.

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    HDL

    HDL is known as the “good” cholesterol because high levels of cholesterol in the HDL reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease. HDL’s role may be to carry cholesterol away from plaque in your blood vessel and return it to the liver.

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    LDL

    LDL is known as “bad” cholesterol because having high levels can lead to plaque buildup in your arteries and result in heart disease and stroke. The combination of high levels of triglycerides with low HDL cholesterol or high LDL cholesterol can increase your risk for heart attack and stroke.

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    Triglycerides

    Triglycerides are three (tri) fats (glyceride) attached at one end. When you think of fat developing and being stored in your hips or belly, you’re thinking of triglycerides. They are the end product of digesting and breaking down fats in food. Some are made in the body from other energy sources, such as carbohydrates. Having a high level of triglycerides in your blood, can increase your risk of heart disease. Elevated triglycerides may suggest the presence of other disorders such as prediabetes or diabetes.

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    Apolipoprotein B (Apo B)

    Lipoproteins are large molecules that transport cholesterol through your bloodstream. Apolipoprotein B or, APO B, is a type of lipoprotein and is the specific lipoprotein discussed when you hear the term LDL “bad” cholesterol. Since lipoproteins can carry more than one cholesterol molecule on them at a time, their measurement provides a unique view of how much and what type of “bad” cholesterol is in your blood. Increased levels of Apo B have been associated with increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease and measurement of Apo B can provide information not always reflected in the LDL “bad” cholesterol value alone. Elevated Apo B reflects increased heart disease risk and elevated Apo A1 reflects reduced heart disease risk. Thus, the ratio of Apo B to Apo A1 provides a measure of the Bad (Apo B) to the Good (Apo A1) and can be a better predictor of heart disease risk than either alone.

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    Apolipoprotein A1 (Apo A1)

    Lipoproteins are large molecules that transport cholesterol through your bloodstream. Apolipoprotein A1 or, APO A1, is a type of lipoprotein and is the specific lipoprotein discussed when you hear the term HDL “good” cholesterol. Since lipoproteins can carry more than one cholesterol molecule on them at a time, their measurement provides a unique view of how much and what type of “good” cholesterol is in your blood. Apo A1 plays a critical role in the removing cholesterol from the plaque build-up in the arteries. Like elevated HDL “good” cholesterol, elevated Apo A1 is associated with reduced heart disease risk. Elevated Apo B reflects increased heart disease risk and elevated Apo A1 reflects reduced heart disease risk. Thus, the ratio of Apo B to Apo A-I provides a measure of the Bad (Apo B) to the Good (Apo A-I) and can be a better predictor of heart disease risk than either alone.

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    Apo B:Apo A ratio

    Apolipoprotein B (ApoB) is the primary protein component of low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) is the primary protein associated with high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Therefore, the ApoB : ApoA1 ratio represents the balance between atherogenic (bad) and antiatherogenic (good) lipoproteins. Several large prospective studies have shown that the ApoB : ApoA1 ratio performs better than traditional lipids as a risk indicator of coronary artery disease.

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    Small-dense LDL

    The “Bad” Apo B lipoproteins (LDL) can be present in 7 different types and can be generally classified into large and small. If a person has a large number of primarily small, dense LDL (sdLDL), cardiovascular disease risk may be increased up to 3 times. The finding of an abundance of small, dense LDL and high level of Apo B increases the risk of developing cardiovascular disease above and beyond the risk associated with the traditional biomarker– LDL “bad” cholesterol.

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    Lipoprotein (a)

    Lipoprotein (a) is a small protein carried in the bloodstream that transports cholesterol in the body. Excessive Lp(a) may deposit in blood vessels and cause plaque buildup in your blood vessels, which narrows blood vessels and reduces blood supply to vital organs such as the heart, kidneys and brain. Lipoprotein (a) may also facilitate the process of breaking up clots. As a result, people with high Lipoprotein (a) levels are more prone to developing blood clots that may manifest as heart attacks and strokes.

Additional information

Apolipoprotein A1 (Apo A1)

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Apo B:Apo A ratio

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