Major Organ<br>Check

Member Pricing – $75.00

Non-Member Pricing – $99.00

Major Organ Check

We have designed this panel of tests to incorporate common ones your physician may order during a routine physical, but beefed it up by adding additional tests that typically wouldn’t be covered by insurance that your physician can use to better assess your overall health status.

  • Pancreas
  • Kidneys
  • Liver
  • Thyroid
  • Parathyroid
  • Blood proteins
  • Hormones

Note: Please allow apx. 10 business days for your results to appear after you have submitted your sample.

Overview | Summary | Detail

Category: SKU: 1002

Description

Click on the tests below to learn more about each one and discuss with your physician if this testing is appropriate for you to better manage your personal health or existing disease.

Major Organ Check

Major Organ Check

Below are the individual tests that are included in Ultimate Health Check that will show on your Prevé report in the MyPreve area. 

Major Organ Check

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    Amylase

    Amylase is an enzyme produced by your pancreas and salivary glands. The pancreas is an organ located behind your stomach and creates various enzymes that help break down food in your intestines. The most common cause of elevation of serum amylase is inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis). Other causes of elevated serum amylase are inflammation of salivary glands, liver disease and bowel obstruction.

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    Chloride

    A key component of the body’s electrolytes; involved in acid-base balance and hydration status. Chloride measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of electrolyte and metabolic disorders such as cystic fibrosis and diabetic acidosis.

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    Blood Urea Nitrogen

    BUN is blood urea nitrogen and is a product of your body’s natural metabolism. The protein from the dietary source is broken down to amino acids in your body, with a waste product generated called urea. The urea travels from your liver to your kidneys through your bloodstream. Healthy kidneys filter urea and remove other waste products from your blood. The filtered waste products leave your body through urine. Therefore, if liver or kidney is damaged, you may see abnormal urea level in your blood which could indicate liver disease, kidney disease, heart disease, gastrointestinal disease, etc. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN) actually uses the amount of urea nitrogen in your blood to reflect the urea level.

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    Potassium

    Found in all cells, potassium is a good indicator on how balanced your electrolytes are. Potassium tells us about heart function and muscle performance. Potassium is a key player in heart function and muscle contraction, making it important for normal digestive and muscular function. Abnormal potassium levels in blood are related to metabolic or respiratory acidosis, irregulated hormone balance, drug toxicity, kidney disease, etc.

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    Sodium

    Sodium and potassium are particularly important in the renal regulation of acid-base balance by maintaining constant movement between intracellular (inside the cells) and extracellular (outside the cells) body compartments. They are both important in how nerves and muscles work. Abnormal sodium levels may be due to adrenal gland problems or irregulated hormone balance, diabetes, drug toxicity, kidney disease, heart problems, liver disease, and other diseases.

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    Creatinine (Blood)

    Creatinine is a chemical waste product that’s produced by your muscle, filtered by kidneys and excreted in urine. A serum creatinine test can indicate whether your kidneys are working properly. Generally, a high serum creatinine level means that your kidneys aren’t working well. However, blood creatinine level may temporarily increase if you’re dehydrated, have a low blood volume, eat a large amount of meat or take certain medications and dietary supplements.

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    Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP)

    Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP) is an enzyme that helps out in various important biological processes, such as transport nutrients and other enzymes in the liver, aid the formation and growth of bones, regulate cell growth, death, and migration etc. Abnormal ALP levels indicate either liver disease or bone disease.

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    Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT)

    Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT) is an enzyme found mostly in liver and kidney cells. Our body releases ALT into the blood when the liver is damaged (i.e. hepatitis and cirrhosis). ALT is usually measured concurrently with AST as part of a liver function panel to determine the source of organ damage (liver or heart).

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    Aspartate Transaminase (AST)

    Aspartate Transaminase (AST) is an enzyme that is released when your liver or muscles are damaged. Although AST is found mainly in your liver and heart, AST can also be found in small amounts in other muscles. AST is usually measured concurrently with ALT as part of a liver function panel to determine the source of organ damage (liver or heart).

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    Total Bilirubin

    Bilirubin is an orange-yellowish pigment found in bile, a fluid made by the liver. It is made during the replacement of your old red blood cells by new blood cells and it passes through the liver and excreted out of the body. A Bilirubin test is mainly used to check your liver health. When there is jaundice, blockage in your liver bile ducts, liver disease such as hepatitis, drug toxicity, gallbladder problems or abnormal break down of your red blood cells, bilirubin will increase.

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    Thyroid Stimulating Hormone

    Thyroid Stimulating Hormone or TSH is a measurement of how much of this hormone in your blood. The thyroid is a small, butterfly-shaped gland in your neck. TSH test screens for thyroid disorders such as hyperthyroidism (when thyroid is overactive and not enough TSH is released) or hypothyroidism (when thyroid is underactive and excessive TSH is released). Thyroid dysfunction results in a number of consequences and symptoms, such as heart disease, diabetes and Alzheimer’s.

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    Free Triiodothyronine (T3) and Thyroxine (T4)

    Triiodothyronine (T3) and Thyroxine (T4) are thyroid hormones. The thyroid is a small, butterfly-shaped gland in your neck. The 2 main hormones secreted by the thyroid gland are thyroxine, which contains 4 atoms of iodine (T4), and triiodothyronine, which contains 3 atoms of iodine (T3). Abnormal T3, T4 or TSH could be related to thyroid dysfunction such as hyperthyroidism (when thyroid is overactive) or hypothyroidism (when thyroid is underactive), thyroiditis (inflammation of the thyroid), drugs and hormone supplements, etc. Thyroid dysfunction results in a number of consequences and symptoms, such as heart disease, diabetes and Alzheimer’s.

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    Calcium

    Calcium is one of the most common elements in our body, and its balance is controlled by parathyroid hormone from the parathyroid, which are the small glands located in your neck. Abnormal parathyroid function usually leads to uncontrolled calcium release from your bone thus calcium in blood will increase (concomitantly phosphorus will decrease). Too little calcium in your bones and too much calcium circulating in your blood stream will cause various complications, such as bone fracture (osteoporosis), kidney stones, cardiovascular disease, etc.

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    Phosphorus

    Phosphorus is an element and mineral used by the body for strong bones and teeth. It is also important in nerve signaling and muscle contraction. It can also be used in conjunction with parathyroid hormone and calcium to evaluate your parathyroid function.

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    CBC

    A complete blood count (CBC) is a diagnostic test used to assess your overall health and detect a wide range of disorders from anemia, infections and leukemia.

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    Albumin

    The major proteins existed in the blood are albumin and globulin. Albumin accounts for over 50% of the total blood proteins. Testing albumin levels is useful to assess a broad range of potential conditions including; kidney disease, gastrointestinal disease, immune disorders, liver malfunction, poor nutrition, chronic edema.

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    Total Protein

    Proteins are critical components of all cells. The total protein test measures the total amount of two classes of proteins: albumin and globulin. Total protein is useful in accessing nutritional status, liver disease, kidney disease, gastrointestinal disease.

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    Globulin

    Globulin is a snapshot on the amount of protein in your blood. High levels could mean overall dehydration or various disease including kidney, lupus, or liver disease. Low levels of globuilin mean your body isn’t producing enough protein which may indicate an infection, inflammation, or an autoimmune disorder. People with cancer have also been shown to have lower levels of globulin.

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    Total Testosterone

    Testosterone is an essential hormone produced both in men and women. Most circulating testosterone is bound to sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and a small proportion exists as free hormone. Total testosterone, SHBG and free testosterone are used together to indicate to diseases of various organs such as testicles, pituitary gland (a tiny organ, the size of a pea, found at the base of your brain), thyroid, ovaries, and adrenal glands (two small glands located on the top of each kidney).

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    Free Testosterone

    Testosterone is an essential hormone produced both in men and women. Most circulating testosterone is bound to sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and a small proportion exists as free hormone. Total testosterone, SHBG and free testosterone are used together to indicate to diseases of various organs such as testicles, pituitary gland (a tiny organ, the size of a pea, found at the base of your brain), thyroid, ovaries, and adrenal glands (two small glands located on the top of each kidney).

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    Estradiol

    Estradiol is an estrogen produced primarily in ovaries in female and generated from testosterone in male. Measurement of serum estradiol forms an integral part of the assessment of reproductive function in females. Estradiol has a large fluctuation during the menstrual cycle in premenopausal women and it is much lower in men and postmenopausal women. Abnormal estradiol level in conjunction with other markers (such as luteinizing hormone and follicle stimulating hormone) are associated with reproductive system dysfunction and failure, and increased risk for bone fractures.

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    Cortisol

    Cortisol is a main glucocorticoid which plays a critical role in your blood sugar metabolism, stress response, bone growth, blood pressure control, immune system function, and even nervous system function. Abnormal cortisol level in blood may indicate diseases of pituitary (a tiny organ sits in the base of your brain) and adrenal glands (two small glands located on the top of each kidney). Dysregulated cortisol level in your body can lead to a number of health problems such as anxiety, depression, headaches, trouble sleeping, weight gain, and heart disease.