Nutrition<br>Check

Member Pricing – $149.00

Non-Member Pricing – $199.00

Nutrition Check

This panel of tests was designed to provide you and your physician with the status of important vitamins, nutrients and antioxidants, which have been clinically shown to support good metabolic, organ and vascular health as well as inhibit oxidative stress and chronic inflammation.

  • Folate
  • Vitamin B12
  • Vitamin D
  • CoQ10
  • EPA (Omega 3)
  • DHA (Omega 3)
  • AA (Omega 6)
     

Note: Please allow apx. 10 business days for your results to appear after you have submitted your sample.

Overview | Summary | Detail

Category: SKU: 1007

Description

Click on the tests below to learn more about each one and discuss with your physician if this testing is appropriate for you to better manage your personal health or existing disease.

Nutrition Check

Nutrition Check

Below are the individual tests that are included in Ultimate Health Check that will show on your Prevé report in the MyPreve area. 

Nutrition Check

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    Folate

    Our bodies cannot make Folate or B12, so we must get these essential vitamins from our diet. Our bodies use these two vitamins to encourage iron production. If either one too low while the other one is high or both are too low our bodies can struggle using the right amount of iron to transport oxygen throughout our body. This can lead to anemia.

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    B12

    Our bodies cannot make Folate or B12, so we must get these essential vitamins from our diet. Our bodies use these two vitamins to encourage iron production. If either one too low while the other one is high or both are too low our bodies can struggle using the right amount of iron to transport oxygen throughout our body. This can lead to anemia.

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    Vitamin D

    Vitamin D is a hormone which is crucial for your body. It helps to keep your bones, teeth and muscles healthy. It serves as an antioxidant of the cell membrane in terms of stabilizing and protecting the cell membrane from free radical damage. Vitamin D plays a key role in our body’s ability to make glutathione, which is one of the most powerful antioxidant and free radical scavengers available. However, like anything consumed in excess, too much Vitamin D can have negative effects on our health. Both insufficient and excessive Vitamin D can cause various diseases such as cardiovascular disease, falls and fracture, and even cancer. Therefore, routinely monitoring your Vitamin D levels, establishing a stable, personal range and discussions with your physician are recommended.

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    CoQ10*

    CoQ10 plays a unique role in the cellular chain of generating energy for the normal function and performance of all cells. The “brother” of CoQ10, ubiquinol, acts as a free radical scavenger, helping to reduce oxidative stress damage to cells, tissues and organs. So, your body even uses CoQ10 by converting it into a free radical scavenger. Low circulating CoQ10 levels have been associated with cardiovascular diseases, Parkinson disease, diabetes, Alzheimer disease, as well as in aging and oxidative stress. However, like anything consumed in excess, too much CoQ10 can have negative effects on our health. Excess CoQ10 can cause nausea, weight loss, diarrhea and even lower your blood pressure too much (especially if you already have low blood pressure). Therefore, routinely monitoring your CoQ10 levels, establishing a stable, personal range and discussions with your physician are recommended.

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    AA: EPA ratio*

    Arachidonic acid or AA, a critical omega-6 fatty acid, is a precursor of various inflammatory and anti-inflammatory mediators (mostly inflammatory products). On the other hand, DHA and EPA as the most important omega-3 fatty acids, their blood levels have been demonstrated to be associated with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities thus lower risk of both cardiovascular diseases (including coronary heart disease and stroke, ischemic heart disease, arrhythmic cardiac events, myocardial infarction and fatal coronary heart disease) and sudden death in multiple high quality clinical studies. Therefore, AA: EPA ratio serves as a useful biomarker to indicate the balance between EPA and AA. AA: EPA ratio has been shown to be closely related to chronic diseases such as heart disease, inflammation, metabolic diseases, etc. Current dietary guidelines for omega-3 fatty acids recommend a healthy dietary pattern (including at least two servings of fatty fish per week) as the preferred option to increase DHA and EPA level thus to decrease AA: EPA ratio. The larger ratio (high AA or low EPA) means more harm and small ratio (low AA or high EPA) means more benefit to your health. A broad population study of Americans with statistical modeling showed an optimal AA: EPA ratio range from 2-23. The ratio between 24 – 47 (<25% of the population) is considered at borderline and >47 is at risk (<10% of the population).

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    EPA* (eicosapentaenoic acid)

    Omega-3 fatty acids some of which are also referred to as fish oils such as Docosahexaenoic acid or DHA and Eicosapentaenoic acid or EPA, have been associated with reduced heart disease risk. Low blood levels of DHA and EPA are associated with oxidative stress and inflammation as well as increased cardiovascular events, depression, and early neurological deterioration. A broad population study of Americans with statistical modeling showed an optimal blood level of EPA range from 14 -33 µg/mL. With a larger number being more beneficial to health. Blood EPA level between 8 – 13 µg/mL (<25% of the population) is considered at borderline and <8 µg/mL is at risk (<10% of the population). Japanese people has been well known for their high consumption of fish and low risk of cardiovascular disease. As a comparison, the lower 5th percentile of blood omega-3 fatty acids (DHA and EPA) in the Japanese living in Japan is higher than the mean levels in whites and Japanese Americans.

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    DHA* (docosahexaenoic acid)

    Omega-3 fatty acids some of which are also referred to as fish oils such as Docosahexaenoic acid or DHA and Eicosapentaenoic acid or EPA, have been associated with reduced heart disease risk. Low blood levels of DHA and EPA are associated with oxidative stress and inflammation as well as increased cardiovascular events, depression, and early neurological deterioration. A broad population study of Americans with statistical modeling showed an optimal blood level of EPA range from 14 -33 µg/mL. With a larger number being more beneficial to health. Blood EPA level between 8 – 13 µg/mL (<25% of the population) is considered at borderline and <8 µg/mL is at risk (<10% of the population). Japanese people has been well known for their high consumption of fish and low risk of cardiovascular disease. As a comparison, the lower 5th percentile of blood omega-3 fatty acids (DHA and EPA) in the Japanese living in Japan is higher than the mean levels in whites and Japanese Americans.

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    AA* (arachidonic acid)

    Is omega-6 fatty acid a really “bad” fat? Multiple well known studies have found that higher linoleic acid intake, a major and essential omega-6 fatty acid mainly found in vegetable oil, is protective, not detrimental, against coronary heart disease. However, diets high in omega-6 fatty acids increase the susceptibility of LDL to oxidative modification, an effect that could be considered pro-atherogenic. Therefore, it is over simplified to define omega-6 just as a bad fat. As with anything we consume, excessive amounts of omega-6 fatty acids can have negative effects on our health. This is not necessarily because omega-6 fatty acids are inherently bad, but because most western style diets contain much more omega-6 fatty acids than our bodies can process efficiently. The excess omega-6 fatty acids from our diet can trigger pro-inflammatory chemicals within our bodies. Arachidonic acid or AA, a critical omega-6 fatty acid, is both a product of linoleic acid and a precursor of various inflammatory and anti-inflammatory mediators in our body (but mostly inflammatory products). Eating a variety of foods like fresh vegetables, fruits, fish, nuts, grass fed beef and limiting most fried and processed foods, can result in a dietary omega 6:omega 3 ratio preferred by most nutritionists of less than 4:1. For comparison, it is not uncommon for western style diets to produce 50:1 or higher dietary omega 6: omega 3 ratios. A broad population study of Americans with statistical modeling showed an optimal blood level of AA range from 153 -321 µg/mL. With a larger number being more harmful to health. Blood AA level between 322 – 374 µg/mL (<25% of the population) is considered at borderline and >374 µg/mL is at risk (<10% of the population).

Additional information

CoQ10*

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