Ultimate Health
Check

$49.99 per mo.
(billed to your credit card monthly for 12 months)

Includes over $2000 worth of critical and advanced laboratory testing, free one year access to MyPreve member portal and additional discounts on follow-up testing!

Ultimate Health Check

  • Affordable testing for your personal health management
  • Used to follow-up on treatment plans
  • Traditional Lipids
  • Advanced Lipids
  • Endothelial Health
  • Heart Stress
  • Major Organ Status
  • Pre-Diabetes/Diabetes
  • Nutrition

 

Overview | Summary | Detail

Category: SKU: 1000

Description

Click on the tests below to learn more about each one and discuss with your physician if this testing is appropriate for you to better manage your personal health or existing disease.

Ultimate Health Check

Ultimate Health Check

  • Traditional Lipids &
    Advanced Lipids Check

  • Total Cholesterol

    A measure of the total amount of cholesterol in your blood. High levels of cholesterol increase your risk for heart attack and stroke.
  • HDL

    "Good" cholesterol helps to prevent plaque build-up in your blood vessels. Optimal levels reduce your risk for heart attack or stroke.
  • Functional HDL

    This measure takes into account your levels of SDMA. High levels of SDMA reduce the effectiveness of HDL "good" cholesterol.
  • LDL

    LDL is known as “bad” cholesterol because having high levels can lead to plaque buildup in your arteries and result in heart disease and stroke.
  • Triglycerides

    Having a high level of triglycerides (a type of fat) in your blood, can increase your risk of heart disease. Elevated triglycerides may suggest the presence of other disorders such as prediabetes or diabetes.
  • Apolipoprotein B (Apo B)

    Apolipoprotein B or, APO B, is a type of lipoprotein and is the specific lipoprotein discussed when you hear the term LDL "bad" cholesterol. Apo B can provide information not always reflected in the LDL "bad" cholesterol value alone.
  • Apolipoprotein A1 (Apo A1)

    Apolipoprotein A1 or, APO A1, is a type of lipoprotein and is the specific lipoprotein discussed when you hear the term HDL "good" cholesterol. . Like elevated HDL "good" cholesterol, elevated Apo A1 is associated with reduced heart disease risk.
  • Apo B:Apo A ratio

    A 2004 global clinical study (INTERHEART) showed the APO B:APO A ratio was second only to smoking at predicting heart disease risk and was a better predictor than traditional lipid panels regardless of gender, age or ethnicity.
  • Small-dense LDL

    The “Bad” Apo B lipoproteins can be generally classified into large and small. If a person has a large number of primarily small, dense LDL (sdLDL), cardiovascular disease risk may be increased up to 3 times.
  • Lipoprotein (a)

    Elevated Lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)] is an inherited, independent risk factor for heart disease. This means that if your Lp(a) is elevated you are at an even greater risk for heart disease or stroke regardless of any other measure and it is strongly recommended to have your immediate relatives tested as well.
  • Vascular Health Check

  • ADMA

    ADMA, or Asymmetric Dimethylarginine inhibits the production of nitric oxide (NO), which is essential for protecting our blood vessels from potential damage and proper functioning. Elevated ADMA levels are also associated with a 2.5 fold risk increase of future heart disease and are early signs of insulin resistance, the root cause of type 2 diabetes.
  • SDMA

    Elevated SDMA, or Symmetric Dimethylarginine, levels are also associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD), coronary artery disease (CAD) and diabetes. Both diabetes and heart disease have been associated with an increased risk for Alzheimer's disease.
  • Lp-PLA2

    Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) is produced by the body during inflammation caused by oxidative stress. It is used as an inflammatory marker of cardiovascular disease and plays a role in the inflammation of blood vessels. Individuals with elevated Lp-PLA2 activity are twice as likely to experience a heart disease event.
  • Heart Stress Check

  • NT-proBNP

    N-terminal pro–B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) is a special hormone produced by your heart. Your body makes NT-proBNP to help control your cardiac wall stress. Our bodies should do this naturally, so elevated levels of NT-proBNP mean our bodies are having difficulty maintaining optimum cardiac wall stress.
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  • Hemoglobin-A1C (%)

    High HbA1c levels are related to prediabetes or diabetes, which may lead to more serious conditions such as cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, vision loss, or cognitive impairment.
  • Microalbumin (creatinine adjusted)

    Urine microalbumin test is used to detect very small levels of a blood protein (albumin) in your urine, which indicates the early signs of both heart disease and kidney damage. Increased amounts of albumin in urine is a strong and independent indicator of increased cardiovascular and kidney disease risk.
  • Adiponectin

    Adiponectin is a protein hormone and is involved in regulating glucose and fatty acid breakdown. Low levels of Adiponectin places you at increased risk of developing Type II Diabetes and heart disease.
  • Glucose

    Glucose is needed by your body to provide energy to carry out your normal activities. This is measured after fasting to determine if your body is regulating glucose well. High levels after fasting indicate pre-diabetes or diabetes.
  • Insulin

    Insulin is a hormone our body produces to help move glucose into our cells for energy. Low levels of insulin could indicate insulin resistance, pre-diabetes, diabetes or metabolic syndrome. High levels could indicate hyperglycemia.
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  • Amylase

    Amylase is an enzyme produced by your pancreas and salivary glands. The most common cause of elevation of serum amylase is inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis).
  • Chloride

    A key component of the body’s electrolytes; involved in acid-base balance and hydration status. Chloride measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of electrolyte and metabolic disorders such as cystic fibrosis and diabetic acidosis.
  • Blood Urea Nitrogen (BUN)

    Elevated BUN (blood urea nitrogen) levels are an indicator of potential kidney or liver damage.
  • Potassium

    Found in all cells, potassium is a good indicator on how balanced your electrolytes are. Abnormal potassium levels in blood are related to metabolic or respiratory acidosis, irregulated hormone balance, drug toxicity, or kidney disease.
  • Sodium

    Abnormal sodium levels may be due to adrenal gland problems or irregulated hormone balance, diabetes, drug toxicity, kidney disease, heart problems, liver disease, and other diseases.
  • Creatinine (Blood)

    Creatinine is a chemical waste product that's produced by your muscle, filtered by kidneys and excreted in urine. A serum creatinine test can indicate whether your kidneys are working properly.
  • Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP)

    Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP) is an enzyme thatis involved in various important biological processes, such as transporting nutrients and other enzymes in the liver. . Abnormal ALP levels indicate either liver disease or bone disease.
  • Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT)

    Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) is an enzyme found mostly in liver and kidney cells. Our body releases ALT into the blood when the liver is damaged (i.e. hepatitis and cirrhosis). ALT is usually measured concurrently with AST as part of a liver function panel to determine the source of organ damage (liver or heart).
  • Aspartate Aminotransferase (AST)

    Aspartate transaminase (AST) is an enzyme that is released when your liver or muscles are damaged. Although AST is found mainly in your liver and heart, AST can also be found in small amounts in other muscles. AST is usually measured concurrently with ALT as part of a liver function panel to determine the source of organ damage (liver or heart).
  • T.Bilirubin

    A Bilirubin test is mainly used to check your liver health. When there is jaundice, blockage in your liver bile ducts, liver disease such as hepatitis, drug toxicity, gallbladder problems or abnormal break down of your red blood cells, bilirubin will increase.
  • Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH)

    Thyroid stimulating hormone or TSH is a measurement of how much of this hormone is in your blood. This test can check if your thyroid is overactive (hyperthyroidism) or underactive (hypothyroidism).
  • Free T3/T4

    Triiodothyronine (T3) and Thyroxine (T4) are thyroid hormones. Abnormal T3, T4 or TSH levels could be related to thyroid dysfunction.
  • Calcium

    Calcium is one of the most common minerals in our body, and its balance is controlled by the parathyroid hormone released from the parathyroid glands. A calcium imbalance can cause various complications, such as bone fracture (osteoporosis), kidney stones and cardiovascular disease.
  • Phosphorus

    Phosphorus is a mineral used by the body for strong bones and teeth. It is also important in nerve signaling and muscle contraction. It can also be used in conjunction with parathyroid hormone and calcium to evaluate your parathyroid function.
  • CBC

    A complete blood count (CBC) is a diagnostic test used to assess your overall health and detect a wide range of disorders from anemia, infections and leukemia.
  • Albumin

    The major proteins in the blood are albumin and globulin. Albumin accounts for over 50% of the total blood proteins. Testing albumin levels is useful to assess a broad range of potential conditions including; kidney disease, gastrointestinal disease, immune disorders, liver malfunction and poor nutrition.
  • Total Protein

    Proteins are critical components of all cells. The total protein test measures the total amount of two classes of proteins: albumin and globulin. Total protein is useful in accessing nutritional status, liver disease, kidney disease and gastrointestinal disease.
  • Globulin

    Globulin is a snapshot on the amount of protein in your blood. High levels could mean overall dehydration or various disease including kidney, lupus, or liver disease. Low levels of globuilin mean your body isn't producing enough protein which may indicate an infection, inflammation, or an autoimmune disorder. People with cancer have also been shown to have lower levels of globulin.
  • Total Testosterone

    Testosterone is an essential hormone produced both in men and women. Most circulating testosterone is bound to sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and a small proportion exists as free hormone. Total testosterone can be used to indicate to disfunction of various organs such as testicles, pituitary gland, thyroid, ovaries, and adrenal glands.
  • Free Testosterone

    Testosterone is an essential hormone produced both in men and women. Most circulating testosterone is bound to sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and a small proportion exists as free hormone. Free testosterone is used to indicate disfunction of various organs such as testicles, pituitary gland, thyroid, ovaries, and adrenal glands.
  • Estradiol

    Estradiol is an estrogen produced primarily in ovaries in female and generated from testosterone in male. Measurement of serum estradiol forms an integral part of the assessment of reproductive function in females. Abnormal estradiol level in conjunction with other markers are associated with reproductive system dysfunction, and increased risk for bone fractures.
  • Cortisol

    Cortisol hormone plays a critical role in your blood sugar metabolism, stress response, bone growth, blood pressure control, immune system function, and even nervous system function. Dysregulated cortisol level in your body can lead to a number of health problems such as anxiety, depression, headaches, trouble sleeping, weight gain, and heart disease.
  • Folate

    Our bodies cannot make Folate or B12, so we must get these essential vitamins from our diet. Our bodies use these two vitamins to encourage iron production. If either one is too low while the other one is high or both are too low our bodies can struggle using the right amount of iron to transport oxygen throughout our body. This can lead to anemia.
  • B12

    Our bodies cannot make Folate or B12, so we must get these essential vitamins from our diet. Our bodies use these two vitamins to encourage iron production. If either one too low while the other one is high or both are too low our bodies can struggle using the right amount of iron to transport oxygen throughout our body. This can lead to anemia.
  • Vitamin D

    Vitamin D is a hormone which is crucial for your body. It helps to keep your bones, teeth and muscles healthy. It serves as an antioxidant of the cell membrane in terms of stabilizing and protecting the cell membrane from free radical damage. Vitamin D plays a key role in our body's ability to make glutathione, which is one of the most powerful antioxidant and free radical scavengers available.
  • CoQ10*

    CoQ10 plays a unique role in the cellular chain of generating energy for the normal function and performance of all cells. The "brother" of CoQ10, ubiquinol, acts as a free radical scavenger, helping to reduce oxidative stress damage to cells, tissues and organs. Low circulating CoQ10 levels have been associated with cardiovascular diseases, Parkinson disease, diabetes, Alzheimer disease, as well as in aging and oxidative stress.
  • AA:EPA ratio*

    Arachidonic acid, or AA - a critical omega-6 fatty acid, is a precursor of various inflammatory mediators. On the other hand, DHA and EPA are the most important omega-3 fatty acids, their blood levels have been demonstrated to be associated with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. AA: EPA ratio has been shown to be closely related to chronic diseases such as heart disease, inflammation, metabolic diseases and others.
  • EPA* (eicosapentaenoic acid)

    Omega-3 fatty acids some of which are also referred to as fish oils such as Docosahexaenoic acid or DHA and Eicosapentaenoic acid or EPA, have been associated with reduced heart disease risk. Low blood levels of DHA and EPA are associated with oxidative stress and inflammation as well as increased cardiovascular events, depression, and early neurological deterioration.
  • DHA* (docosahexaenoic acid)

    Omega-3 fatty acids some of which are also referred to as fish oils such as Docosahexaenoic acid or DHA and Eicosapentaenoic acid or EPA, have been associated with reduced heart disease risk. Low blood levels of DHA and EPA are associated with oxidative stress and inflammation as well as increased cardiovascular events, depression, and early neurological deterioration.
  • AA* (arachidonic acid)

    Diets high in omega-6 fatty acids increase the susceptibility of LDL to oxidative modification, an effect that could be considered pro-atherogenic. The excess omega-6 fatty acids from our diet can trigger pro-inflammatory chemicals within our bodies.
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Below are the individual tests that are included in Ultimate Health Check that will show on your Prevé report in the MyPreve area. 

Heart Check

Traditional & Advanced Lipids Check
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    Total Cholesterol

    A measure of the total amount of cholesterol in your blood. When there is too much cholesterol in your blood, it builds up in the walls of your arteries, causing a process called atherosclerosis, a form of heart disease. As the arteries become narrowed and blood flow to the heart muscle is slowed down, a blood clot can suddenly block the blood flow to your heart or brain and cause a heart attack or stroke.

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    HDL

    HDL is known as the “good” cholesterol because high levels of cholesterol in the HDL reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease. HDL’s role may be to carry cholesterol away from plaque in your blood vessel and return it to the liver.

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    Functional HDL

    HDL is known as the “good” cholesterol because high levels of cholesterol in the HDL reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease. HDL’s role may be to carry cholesterol away from plaque in your blood vessel and return it to the liver.

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    LDL

    LDL is known as “bad” cholesterol because having high levels can lead to plaque buildup in your arteries and result in heart disease and stroke. The combination of high levels of triglycerides with low HDL cholesterol or high LDL cholesterol can increase your risk for heart attack and stroke.

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    Triglycerides

    Triglycerides are three (tri) fats (glyceride) attached at one end. When you think of fat developing and being stored in your hips or belly, you’re thinking of triglycerides. They are the end product of digesting and breaking down fats in food. Some are made in the body from other energy sources, such as carbohydrates. Having a high level of triglycerides in your blood, can increase your risk of heart disease. Elevated triglycerides may suggest the presence of other disorders such as prediabetes or diabetes.

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    Apolipoprotein B (Apo B)

    Lipoproteins are large molecules that transport cholesterol through your bloodstream. Apolipoprotein B or, APO B, is a type of lipoprotein and is the specific lipoprotein discussed when you hear the term LDL “bad” cholesterol. Since lipoproteins can carry more than one cholesterol molecule on them at a time, their measurement provides a unique view of how much and what type of “bad” cholesterol is in your blood. Increased levels of Apo B have been associated with increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease and measurement of Apo B can provide information not always reflected in the LDL “bad” cholesterol value alone. Elevated Apo B reflects increased heart disease risk and elevated Apo A1 reflects reduced heart disease risk. Thus, the ratio of Apo B to Apo A1 provides a measure of the Bad (Apo B) to the Good (Apo A1) and can be a better predictor of heart disease risk than either alone.

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    Apolipoprotein A1 (Apo A1)

    Lipoproteins are large molecules that transport cholesterol through your bloodstream. Apolipoprotein A1 or, APO A1, is a type of lipoprotein and is the specific lipoprotein discussed when you hear the term HDL “good” cholesterol. Since lipoproteins can carry more than one cholesterol molecule on them at a time, their measurement provides a unique view of how much and what type of “good” cholesterol is in your blood. Apo A1 plays a critical role in the removing cholesterol from the plaque build-up in the arteries. Like elevated HDL “good” cholesterol, elevated Apo A1 is associated with reduced heart disease risk. Elevated Apo B reflects increased heart disease risk and elevated Apo A1 reflects reduced heart disease risk. Thus, the ratio of Apo B to Apo A-I provides a measure of the Bad (Apo B) to the Good (Apo A-I) and can be a better predictor of heart disease risk than either alone.

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    Apo B:Apo A ratio

    Apolipoprotein B (ApoB) is the primary protein component of low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) is the primary protein associated with high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Therefore, the ApoB : ApoA1 ratio represents the balance between atherogenic (bad) and antiatherogenic (good) lipoproteins. Several large prospective studies have shown that the ApoB : ApoA1 ratio performs better than traditional lipids as a risk indicator of coronary artery disease.

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    Small-dense LDL

    The “Bad” Apo B lipoproteins (LDL) can be present in 7 different types and can be generally classified into large and small. If a person has a large number of primarily small, dense LDL (sdLDL), cardiovascular disease risk may be increased up to 3 times. The finding of an abundance of small, dense LDL and high level of Apo B increases the risk of developing cardiovascular disease above and beyond the risk associated with the traditional biomarker– LDL “bad” cholesterol.

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    Lipoprotein (a)

    Lipoprotein (a) is a small protein carried in the bloodstream that transports cholesterol in the body. Excessive Lp(a) may deposit in blood vessels and cause plaque buildup in your blood vessels, which narrows blood vessels and reduces blood supply to vital organs such as the heart, kidneys and brain. Lipoprotein (a) may also facilitate the process of breaking up clots. As a result, people with high Lipoprotein (a) levels are more prone to developing blood clots that may manifest as heart attacks and strokes.

Heart Check

Vascular Health
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    ADMA

    ADMA, or asymmetric dimethylarginine, levels increase in the body from high cholesterol, atheroscerlosis and heart disease. ADMA inhibits the production of nitric oxide (NO), which is essential in the proper maintenance of endothelial cell growth in blood vessels. Endothelial cells act as a kind of bubble wrap inside our blood vessel walls protecting our blood vessels from potential damage. Increased levels of ADMA have been shown to generate an excess of free radicals, which can lead to oxidative stress and inflammation. Elevated ADMA levels are also associated with a 2.5 fold risk increase of future heart disease and are early signs of insulin resistance, the root cause of type 2 diabetes. Both diabetes and heart disease have been associated with an increased risk for Alzheimer’s disease.

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    SDMA

    SDMA, or symmetric dimethylarginine, levels increase in the body from high cholesterol, atherosclerosis and heart disease. SDMA can inhibit the production of nitric oxide (NO) through a more complicated pathway than ADMA. NO is essential in the proper maintenance of endothelial cell growth in blood vessels. Endothelial cells act as a kind of bubble wrap inside our blood vessel walls protecting our blood vessels from potential damage. Increased levels of SDMA have been shown to generate an excess of free radicals, which can lead to oxidative stress and inflammation. Elevated SDMA levels are also associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD), coronary artery disease (CAD) and diabetes. Both diabetes and heart disease have been associated with an increased risk for Alzheimer’s disease.

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    Lp-PLA2

    Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) is produced by the body during inflammation caused by oxidative stress. It is used as an inflammatory marker of cardiovascular disease that appears to play a role in the inflammation of blood vessels and is thought to help promote atherosclerosis, coronary heart disease and stroke. Individuals with elevated Lp-PLA2 activity are twice as likely to experience a heart disease event.

Heart Check

Heart Stress
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    NT-proBNP

    N-terminal pro–B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) is a special hormone produced by your heart. Your body makes more NT-proBNP to help control your cardiac wall stress. Our bodies should do this naturally, so elevated levels of NT-proBNP mean our bodies are having difficulty maintaining optimum cardiac wall stress. When there are changes in pressure inside the heart muscle, which can be either heart failure or other cardiac problems, NT-proBNP is produced. Thus, high levels mean your heart is in danger. Therefore, NT-proBNP serves as an invaluable marker to help detect and evaluate the severity of heart failure.

Diabetes Check

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    Hemoglobin-A1C (%)

    Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) test measures the amount of blood sugar (glucose) attached to hemoglobin, which is the part of your red blood cells that carries oxygen from your lungs to the rest of your body. HbA1c test indicates the average amount of glucose attached to hemoglobin within the past three months. High HbA1c levels are related to prediabetes or diabetes, which may lead to more serious conditions such as cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, vision loss, or cognitive impairment.

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    Microalbumin (creatinine adjusted)

    Urine microalbumin test is used to detect very small levels of a blood protein (albumin) in your urine, which indicates the early signs of both heart disease and kidney damage. Healthy kidneys retain proteins such as albumin while damaged kidney can cause proteins to leak through and exit your body in your urine. Albumin is one of the first proteins to leak when kidneys become damaged. Increased albumin in urine is a strong and independent indicator of increased cardiovascular and kidney disease risk.

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    Adiponectin

    Adiponectin is a protein hormone produced and secreted by adipose tissues. Your body uses adiponectin to regulate insulin sensitivity and energy metabolism. Low levels of adiponectin mean your body isn’t creating enough of the hormone to regulate insulin. Thus, adiponectin serves as the marker for diabetes and heart health. People with the lowest levels of adiponectin are up to a 9-fold greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Low adiponectin levels are also associated with a 2-fold increase in the prevalence of coronary artery disease.

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    Glucose

    Glucose is needed by your body to provide energy to carry out your normal activities. This is measured after fasting to determine if your body is regulating glucose well. High levels after fasting indicate pre-diabetes or diabetes. It should be noted that a non-fasting glucose measurement does not represent your baseline levels of glucose, therefore non-fasting glucose measurements should not be considered as a valid measurement.

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    Insulin

    Insulin is a hormone our body produces to help move glucose into your cells for energy.  Low levels of insulin could indicate pre-diabetes, diabetes or metabolic syndrome.  High levels could indicate hyperglycemia. 

Major Organ Check

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    Amylase

    Amylase is an enzyme produced by your pancreas and salivary glands. The pancreas is an organ located behind your stomach and creates various enzymes that help break down food in your intestines. The most common cause of elevation of serum amylase is inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis). Other causes of elevated serum amylase are inflammation of salivary glands, liver disease and bowel obstruction.

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    Chloride

    A key component of the body’s electrolytes; involved in acid-base balance and hydration status. Chloride measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of electrolyte and metabolic disorders such as cystic fibrosis and diabetic acidosis.

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    Blood Urea Nitrogen

    BUN is blood urea nitrogen and is a product of your body’s natural metabolism. The protein from the dietary source is broken down to amino acids in your body, with a waste product generated called urea. The urea travels from your liver to your kidneys through your bloodstream. Healthy kidneys filter urea and remove other waste products from your blood. The filtered waste products leave your body through urine. Therefore, if liver or kidney is damaged, you may see abnormal urea level in your blood which could indicate liver disease, kidney disease, heart disease, gastrointestinal disease, etc. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN) actually uses the amount of urea nitrogen in your blood to reflect the urea level.

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    Potassium

    Found in all cells, potassium is a good indicator on how balanced your electrolytes are. Potassium tells us about heart function and muscle performance. Potassium is a key player in heart function and muscle contraction, making it important for normal digestive and muscular function. Abnormal potassium levels in blood are related to metabolic or respiratory acidosis, irregulated hormone balance, drug toxicity, kidney disease, etc.

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    Sodium

    Sodium and potassium are particularly important in the renal regulation of acid-base balance by maintaining constant movement between intracellular (inside the cells) and extracellular (outside the cells) body compartments. They are both important in how nerves and muscles work. Abnormal sodium levels may be due to adrenal gland problems or irregulated hormone balance, diabetes, drug toxicity, kidney disease, heart problems, liver disease, and other diseases.

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    Creatinine (Blood)

    Creatinine is a chemical waste product that’s produced by your muscle, filtered by kidneys and excreted in urine. A serum creatinine test can indicate whether your kidneys are working properly. Generally, a high serum creatinine level means that your kidneys aren’t working well. However, blood creatinine level may temporarily increase if you’re dehydrated, have a low blood volume, eat a large amount of meat or take certain medications and dietary supplements.

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    Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP)

    Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP) is an enzyme that helps out in various important biological processes, such as transport nutrients and other enzymes in the liver, aid the formation and growth of bones, regulate cell growth, death, and migration etc. Abnormal ALP levels indicate either liver disease or bone disease.

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    Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT)

    Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT) is an enzyme found mostly in liver and kidney cells. Our body releases ALT into the blood when the liver is damaged (i.e. hepatitis and cirrhosis). ALT is usually measured concurrently with AST as part of a liver function panel to determine the source of organ damage (liver or heart).

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    Aspartate Transaminase (AST)

    Aspartate Transaminase (AST) is an enzyme that is released when your liver or muscles are damaged. Although AST is found mainly in your liver and heart, AST can also be found in small amounts in other muscles. AST is usually measured concurrently with ALT as part of a liver function panel to determine the source of organ damage (liver or heart).

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    Total Bilirubin

    Bilirubin is an orange-yellowish pigment found in bile, a fluid made by the liver. It is made during the replacement of your old red blood cells by new blood cells and it passes through the liver and excreted out of the body. A Bilirubin test is mainly used to check your liver health. When there is jaundice, blockage in your liver bile ducts, liver disease such as hepatitis, drug toxicity, gallbladder problems or abnormal break down of your red blood cells, bilirubin will increase.

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    Thyroid Stimulating Hormone

    Thyroid Stimulating Hormone or TSH is a measurement of how much of this hormone in your blood. The thyroid is a small, butterfly-shaped gland in your neck. TSH test screens for thyroid disorders such as hyperthyroidism (when thyroid is overactive and not enough TSH is released) or hypothyroidism (when thyroid is underactive and excessive TSH is released). Thyroid dysfunction results in a number of consequences and symptoms, such as heart disease, diabetes and Alzheimer’s.

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    Free Triiodothyronine (T3) and Thyroxine (T4)

    Triiodothyronine (T3) and Thyroxine (T4) are thyroid hormones. The thyroid is a small, butterfly-shaped gland in your neck. The 2 main hormones secreted by the thyroid gland are thyroxine, which contains 4 atoms of iodine (T4), and triiodothyronine, which contains 3 atoms of iodine (T3). Abnormal T3, T4 or TSH could be related to thyroid dysfunction such as hyperthyroidism (when thyroid is overactive) or hypothyroidism (when thyroid is underactive), thyroiditis (inflammation of the thyroid), drugs and hormone supplements, etc. Thyroid dysfunction results in a number of consequences and symptoms, such as heart disease, diabetes and Alzheimer’s.

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    Calcium

    Calcium is one of the most common elements in our body, and its balance is controlled by parathyroid hormone from the parathyroid, which are the small glands located in your neck. Abnormal parathyroid function usually leads to uncontrolled calcium release from your bone thus calcium in blood will increase (concomitantly phosphorus will decrease). Too little calcium in your bones and too much calcium circulating in your blood stream will cause various complications, such as bone fracture (osteoporosis), kidney stones, cardiovascular disease, etc.

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    Phosphorus

    Phosphorus is an element and mineral used by the body for strong bones and teeth. It is also important in nerve signaling and muscle contraction. It can also be used in conjunction with parathyroid hormone and calcium to evaluate your parathyroid function.

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    CBC

    A complete blood count (CBC) is a diagnostic test used to assess your overall health and detect a wide range of disorders from anemia, infections and leukemia.

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    Albumin

    The major proteins existed in the blood are albumin and globulin. Albumin accounts for over 50% of the total blood proteins. Testing albumin levels is useful to assess a broad range of potential conditions including; kidney disease, gastrointestinal disease, immune disorders, liver malfunction, poor nutrition, chronic edema.

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    Total Protein

    Proteins are critical components of all cells. The total protein test measures the total amount of two classes of proteins: albumin and globulin. Total protein is useful in accessing nutritional status, liver disease, kidney disease, gastrointestinal disease.

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    Globulin

    Globulin is a snapshot on the amount of protein in your blood. High levels could mean overall dehydration or various disease including kidney, lupus, or liver disease. Low levels of globuilin mean your body isn’t producing enough protein which may indicate an infection, inflammation, or an autoimmune disorder. People with cancer have also been shown to have lower levels of globulin.

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    Total Testosterone

    Testosterone is an essential hormone produced both in men and women. Most circulating testosterone is bound to sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and a small proportion exists as free hormone. Total testosterone, SHBG and free testosterone are used together to indicate to diseases of various organs such as testicles, pituitary gland (a tiny organ, the size of a pea, found at the base of your brain), thyroid, ovaries, and adrenal glands (two small glands located on the top of each kidney).

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    Free Testosterone

    Testosterone is an essential hormone produced both in men and women. Most circulating testosterone is bound to sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and a small proportion exists as free hormone. Total testosterone, SHBG and free testosterone are used together to indicate to diseases of various organs such as testicles, pituitary gland (a tiny organ, the size of a pea, found at the base of your brain), thyroid, ovaries, and adrenal glands (two small glands located on the top of each kidney).

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    Estradiol

    Estradiol is an estrogen produced primarily in ovaries in female and generated from testosterone in male. Measurement of serum estradiol forms an integral part of the assessment of reproductive function in females. Estradiol has a large fluctuation during the menstrual cycle in premenopausal women and it is much lower in men and postmenopausal women. Abnormal estradiol level in conjunction with other markers (such as luteinizing hormone and follicle stimulating hormone) are associated with reproductive system dysfunction and failure, and increased risk for bone fractures.

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    Cortisol

    Cortisol is a main glucocorticoid which plays a critical role in your blood sugar metabolism, stress response, bone growth, blood pressure control, immune system function, and even nervous system function. Abnormal cortisol level in blood may indicate diseases of pituitary (a tiny organ sits in the base of your brain) and adrenal glands (two small glands located on the top of each kidney). Dysregulated cortisol level in your body can lead to a number of health problems such as anxiety, depression, headaches, trouble sleeping, weight gain, and heart disease.

Nutrition Check

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    Folate

    Our bodies cannot make Folate or B12, so we must get these essential vitamins from our diet. Our bodies use these two vitamins to encourage iron production. If either one too low while the other one is high or both are too low our bodies can struggle using the right amount of iron to transport oxygen throughout our body. This can lead to anemia.

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    B12

    Our bodies cannot make Folate or B12, so we must get these essential vitamins from our diet. Our bodies use these two vitamins to encourage iron production. If either one too low while the other one is high or both are too low our bodies can struggle using the right amount of iron to transport oxygen throughout our body. This can lead to anemia.

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    Vitamin D

    Vitamin D is a hormone which is crucial for your body. It helps to keep your bones, teeth and muscles healthy. It serves as an antioxidant of the cell membrane in terms of stabilizing and protecting the cell membrane from free radical damage. Vitamin D plays a key role in our body’s ability to make glutathione, which is one of the most powerful antioxidant and free radical scavengers available. However, like anything consumed in excess, too much Vitamin D can have negative effects on our health. Both insufficient and excessive Vitamin D can cause various diseases such as cardiovascular disease, falls and fracture, and even cancer. Therefore, routinely monitoring your Vitamin D levels, establishing a stable, personal range and discussions with your physician are recommended.

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    CoQ10*

    CoQ10 plays a unique role in the cellular chain of generating energy for the normal function and performance of all cells. The “brother” of CoQ10, ubiquinol, acts as a free radical scavenger, helping to reduce oxidative stress damage to cells, tissues and organs. So, your body even uses CoQ10 by converting it into a free radical scavenger. Low circulating CoQ10 levels have been associated with cardiovascular diseases, Parkinson disease, diabetes, Alzheimer disease, as well as in aging and oxidative stress. However, like anything consumed in excess, too much CoQ10 can have negative effects on our health. Excess CoQ10 can cause nausea, weight loss, diarrhea and even lower your blood pressure too much (especially if you already have low blood pressure). Therefore, routinely monitoring your CoQ10 levels, establishing a stable, personal range and discussions with your physician are recommended.

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    AA: EPA ratio*

    Arachidonic acid or AA, a critical omega-6 fatty acid, is a precursor of various inflammatory and anti-inflammatory mediators (mostly inflammatory products). On the other hand, DHA and EPA as the most important omega-3 fatty acids, their blood levels have been demonstrated to be associated with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities thus lower risk of both cardiovascular diseases (including coronary heart disease and stroke, ischemic heart disease, arrhythmic cardiac events, myocardial infarction and fatal coronary heart disease) and sudden death in multiple high quality clinical studies. Therefore, AA: EPA ratio serves as a useful biomarker to indicate the balance between EPA and AA. AA: EPA ratio has been shown to be closely related to chronic diseases such as heart disease, inflammation, metabolic diseases, etc. Current dietary guidelines for omega-3 fatty acids recommend a healthy dietary pattern (including at least two servings of fatty fish per week) as the preferred option to increase DHA and EPA level thus to decrease AA: EPA ratio. The larger ratio (high AA or low EPA) means more harm and small ratio (low AA or high EPA) means more benefit to your health. A broad population study of Americans with statistical modeling showed an optimal AA: EPA ratio range from 2-23. The ratio between 24 – 47 (<25% of the population) is considered at borderline and >47 is at risk (<10% of the population).

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    EPA* (eicosapentaenoic acid)

    Omega-3 fatty acids some of which are also referred to as fish oils such as Docosahexaenoic acid or DHA and Eicosapentaenoic acid or EPA, have been associated with reduced heart disease risk. Low blood levels of DHA and EPA are associated with oxidative stress and inflammation as well as increased cardiovascular events, depression, and early neurological deterioration. A broad population study of Americans with statistical modeling showed an optimal blood level of EPA range from 14 -33 µg/mL. With a larger number being more beneficial to health. Blood EPA level between 8 – 13 µg/mL (<25% of the population) is considered at borderline and <8 µg/mL is at risk (<10% of the population). Japanese people has been well known for their high consumption of fish and low risk of cardiovascular disease. As a comparison, the lower 5th percentile of blood omega-3 fatty acids (DHA and EPA) in the Japanese living in Japan is higher than the mean levels in whites and Japanese Americans.

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    DHA* (docosahexaenoic acid)

    Omega-3 fatty acids some of which are also referred to as fish oils such as Docosahexaenoic acid or DHA and Eicosapentaenoic acid or EPA, have been associated with reduced heart disease risk. Low blood levels of DHA and EPA are associated with oxidative stress and inflammation as well as increased cardiovascular events, depression, and early neurological deterioration. A broad population study of Americans with statistical modeling showed an optimal blood level of EPA range from 14 -33 µg/mL. With a larger number being more beneficial to health. Blood EPA level between 8 – 13 µg/mL (<25% of the population) is considered at borderline and <8 µg/mL is at risk (<10% of the population). Japanese people has been well known for their high consumption of fish and low risk of cardiovascular disease. As a comparison, the lower 5th percentile of blood omega-3 fatty acids (DHA and EPA) in the Japanese living in Japan is higher than the mean levels in whites and Japanese Americans.

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    AA* (arachidonic acid)

    Is omega-6 fatty acid a really “bad” fat? Multiple well known studies have found that higher linoleic acid intake, a major and essential omega-6 fatty acid mainly found in vegetable oil, is protective, not detrimental, against coronary heart disease. However, diets high in omega-6 fatty acids increase the susceptibility of LDL to oxidative modification, an effect that could be considered pro-atherogenic. Therefore, it is over simplified to define omega-6 just as a bad fat. As with anything we consume, excessive amounts of omega-6 fatty acids can have negative effects on our health. This is not necessarily because omega-6 fatty acids are inherently bad, but because most western style diets contain much more omega-6 fatty acids than our bodies can process efficiently. The excess omega-6 fatty acids from our diet can trigger pro-inflammatory chemicals within our bodies. Arachidonic acid or AA, a critical omega-6 fatty acid, is both a product of linoleic acid and a precursor of various inflammatory and anti-inflammatory mediators in our body (but mostly inflammatory products). Eating a variety of foods like fresh vegetables, fruits, fish, nuts, grass fed beef and limiting most fried and processed foods, can result in a dietary omega 6:omega 3 ratio preferred by most nutritionists of less than 4:1. For comparison, it is not uncommon for western style diets to produce 50:1 or higher dietary omega 6: omega 3 ratios. A broad population study of Americans with statistical modeling showed an optimal blood level of AA range from 153 -321 µg/mL. With a larger number being more harmful to health. Blood AA level between 322 – 374 µg/mL (<25% of the population) is considered at borderline and >374 µg/mL is at risk (<10% of the population).

Additional information

Calcium

095

Phosphorus

096

Cortisol

0118